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Game 124: Mariners 3, Indians 1

One of three hits allowed by Zach McAllister.
One of three hits allowed by Zach McAllister.

Boxscore

Brooks Baseball PitchFX - Zach McAllister


Now we're to the part where the Indians actually play well, but lose anyway.

Zach McAllister allowed one run on three and three walks, striking out 4, keeping him above the 100 ERA+ mark. He's now made 15 starts, a half-season for your normal major-league starting pitcher, and has nice earned-run rates and peripherals. He has 3.5 strikeout-to-walk ratio, and is averaging 6 innings a start. He has allowed an astounding 18 unearned runs, but everything else looks good.

Now for the ugly part. Because the Indians have used Pestano/Perez much since the road trip began, Pestano was on five days' rest when he was summoned. The saying goes that relievers "rust out, not wear out" applied here, for he would allow the Mariners to take lead with two run in the bottom of the eighth. The rally started when Kyle Seager hit a hustle double (Manny Acta was thrown for arguing the play at the second, the first time I believe he's been ejected for arguing. Replays showed that ball beat Seager to the bag, but Seager's hand beat Asdrubal Cabrera's glove to the bag). After John Jaso was intentionally walked, Pestano struck out Jesus Montero, bringing up Eric Thames with two outs. Thames had struck out three times on the day, but this time he came through for Seattle, lining a double down the right field line, giving the Mariners a 3-1 lead with only three defensive outs to go.

The Indians did get the tying run on base in the ninth, but nothing further happened off Tom Wilhelmsen. So the Indians finished the road trip with a 1-8 record, and a 1-17 record over their last two road trips, which has to be a record of some sort. Jordan Bastian tweets that the Indians hadn't had two losing streaks of eight or more losses in a row since the infamous 1987 season, in which the team went 61-101 after appearing on the Sports Illustrated cover that spring.


Source: FanGraphs