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Player Profile: Andrew Brown

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Vital Statistics
Full Name: Andrew Aaron Brown
Born: 2-17-1981 (Chardon, OH)
Height: 6'6" Weight: 230 lbs
High School: Trinity Christian Academy (Deltona, FL)
Throws: Right Bats: Right

Baseball Statistics

MLB.com
Hardball Times
Baseball Prospectus
Baseball-Reference
Fangraphs
Baseball Cube (minors)
Minor League Splits (2006)

Service Time/Options

Service Time: 0+
Options: None

Contract Status

  1. Renewable
  2. Renewable
  3. Renewable
  4. Arbitration
  5. Arbitration
  6. Arbitration
  7. Free Agent
Background

Brown's pro career got off to a rough start: he underwent Tommy John surgery at age 19 and missed the entire 2000 season. He came back in 2001 and pitched fairly well in the NYPL (64.1 IP, 3.92 ERA, .215 BAA), and was shipped to the Dodgers as a minor piece of the Gary Sheffield deal that winter. Two years removed from surgery, Brown was skipped to the Florida State League, where he again had success.

The Dodgers thought enough of him to add him to the 40-man roster after the 2002 season. Brown, after all, had a live arm, a big frame, and missed bats. Those high hopes went by the wayside when Brown injured his elbow one start into the season.  He went under the knife for the second time, this time to remove a bone spur from his elbow.

Brown started 2003 healthy in Jacksonville, but he was off the roster by the end of May, this time due to another trade. The Dodgers had acquired Milton Bradley in early April, and the Indians picked Brown from a list of players agreed on when the deal was completed. Cleveland had until the end of May to make their decision, but liked Brown enough to make their decision on May 19th.

After arriving in Akron, Brown again went on the shelf, this time with shoulder fatigue. He wasn't quite the same after returning from the DL, although his peripherals were still decent. Brown was moved to the bullpen the following season, and seemed to turn a corner after a slow start, cutting down on his walks and (most importantly), staying on the field.

The Indians got another option year in 2006 for Brown because of all the time Andrew missed early in his pro career, and sent him back to Buffalo to gain more experience in the bullpen. Brown had success as a setup man, although control problems still haunted him (36 walks in 62.1 innings).

Transactions

6-99: Drafted by the Atlanta Braves (6th Round)
6-3-99: Signed a minor-league contract; Assigned to GCL Braves (R-)
Spent 2000 on Disabled List (elbow)
Started 2001 in Jamestown (SSA)
1-15-02: Traded along with OF Brian Jordon and LHP Odalis Perez to the Atlanta Braves for OF Gary Sheffield
Started 2002 in Vero Beach (A+)
11-02: Contract Purchased by Los Angeles
4-03: Optioned to Jacksonville (AA)
4-7-03: Placed on Disabled List (elbow)
4-04: Optioned to Jacksonville (AA)
5-19-04: Sent to Cleveland as PTBNL (LA had previously sent OF Franklin Gutierrez to Cleveland for OF Milton Bradley on 4-4-04)
5-19-04: Assigned to Akron (AA)
6-15-04: Placed on Disabled List (shoulder)
6-30-04: Reinstated from Disabled List
8-8-04: Promoted to Buffalo (AAA)
8-9-04: Demoted to Akron (AA)
4-05: Optioned to Buffalo (AAA)
4-06: Optioned to Buffalo (AAA)
8-13-06: Recalled from Buffalo (MLB Debut)

Repetroire

(1) Fastball (93-95 mph)
(2) Slider

Strengths

When Andrew throws strikes, he gets outs. He held AAA hitters to a .231 BAA last year. He was more effective against left-handers than right-handers in 2006, holding them to .191/.306/.287 line.

Weaknesses

Control, control, control. Brown walked 36 batters in 62.1 minor-league innings, which is way too much for a setup man. Andrew lives high in the strike zone, which may lead to gopheritis in the big leagues. And there's his lengthy injury history.

2007 Outlook

Brown is one of several relievers out of options. And the Indians are likely to sign or trade for veteran help, which will complicate matters even further. Right now, I have him fourth on the depth chart behind Betancourt, Cabrera, and Miller, and that's not counting younger guys like Edward Mujica and Tony Sipp. In other words, if the Indians bring in three veteran relievers, he's probably gone.